#inktober 12th: walkies

Today I passed a woman taking her dog for a walk IN A BUGGY. He (she?) was wearing a cone round his/her neck.

(In fact she was arranging a rain cover over him but I thought that wouldn’t make such a good picture).

Travelling Dog

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I drew this little dog with a suitcase shortly after the Referendum here in Britain, still reeling from the idea that we will be leaving the EU.
In the last few weeks I’ve been hearing so many shocking stories of racist abuse being hurled at people on the street and in public places.
I thought of my Italian grandmother arriving in England as a teenager before the Second World War, and wondered what prejudices she faced.
Here in Stroud I know people from Hungary, Italy, USA, Poland, Austria, Portugal, Turkey, Wales, Scotland, the Philippines, Japan, Denmark, Sweden, Australia and Germany.
I wouldn’t have it any other way.

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Worldful of Colour

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I immersed myself in colour last week, as I’ve been preparing for an Illustrators’ Sketchbook workshop at the lovely Prema Arts Centre in Uley, Gloucestershire.

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I’ve been coming up with all sorts of ways of approaching colour in a sketchbook – ways of playing with colour; releasing colourful shapes from painted pages; trying out colour combinations; and of course some scribbling,  snipping and gluing.

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And in doing this planning and preparation I’ve come up with things that I would never normally have tried…I found it really hard to stop playing around with colours and go off to school to pick up my kids. I felt as if I was floating along in a different (& quite colourful) world…

Neigh….

ML panto hatThis weekend I have been creating a prototype horse hat for my daughter’s school pantomime. The ears actually stick upright and not out (I forgot that when I was doodling).

At the moment it looks like it could be pretty much any animal…despite the addition of a dodgy-looking mane. BUT something fancy and a bit circus-horse-ish will happen on the top. I hope. Then I’ll need to make four of them!

Why it’s good to eat chips.

It’s good to eat chips from a Chip Shop (preferably by the sea, ideally in Cornwall) because then you can get chip forks.

yoohoo chipforkThen you can turn your chip fork into a little person.

Cooee chipforkThis is the imaginatively-named Miss Chip-Fork.

She’s trying to catch the eye of a handsome moustachioed fellow on the beach.

I think he’s seen her.

cooee:oho chipforks

 

 

 

3 chip forksUnfortunately her other beau is feeling a bit disgruntled about all this eye-catching and oho-ing.

I’d better eat some more chips in case someone else needs to appear.

Drawathon for Nepal

small Drawathon Last week at my children’s school we held a Drawathon to raise money for a school in Nepal. All the children came and drew on long rolls of paper and brought donations to send to a school in Patan, south of Kathmandu. They filled the sheets with beautiful colourful animals, mountains, buildings and flags inspired by what they’d heard about Nepal. small pastels

The first group we had in were 4-5 year olds, and after we’d talked a bit about what we were doing, and looked at photos of Nepal, they rushed at the paper with such enthusiasm I had to jump out of the way! It was amazing to see them lying on their tummies and just drawing, not worrying about getting it right.small roll

Friends of mine had been to Nepal shortly before the first earthquake and had links with the school there, and with a charity that helps the schoolchildren with meals, books and uniforms. The charity also helps them if they complete their education and need further tools or equipment. Sadly some of the children that they met when they visited had since become homeless and some were orphaned.

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My friends came in and talked to the children about the school in Nepal, and we encouraged the children to draw themselves waving at the Nepalese schoolchildren so that we could send photos of the drawings to the headteacher there. A lot of the older children also wrote messages about how they were thinking of the Nepalese children.

small creaturesIt was a wonderful day and we raised over £250 to send to the charity. The children’s drawings are now displayed all around the school outside their classrooms (for as long as the blu-tack holds the heavy paper…)

With fantastic smudgy encouragement from Susie Walker, Hannah Dyson, Juliette Saville, Lucy Birkinshaw, Tessa Walliman, Steve Saville, Sarah Lowe and others! Thank you for the photos, Tessa Walliman.

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