Drawathon for Nepal

small Drawathon Last week at my children’s school we held a Drawathon to raise money for a school in Nepal. All the children came and drew on long rolls of paper and brought donations to send to a school in Patan, south of Kathmandu. They filled the sheets with beautiful colourful animals, mountains, buildings and flags inspired by what they’d heard about Nepal. small pastels

The first group we had in were 4-5 year olds, and after we’d talked a bit about what we were doing, and looked at photos of Nepal, they rushed at the paper with such enthusiasm I had to jump out of the way! It was amazing to see them lying on their tummies and just drawing, not worrying about getting it right.small roll

Friends of mine had been to Nepal shortly before the first earthquake and had links with the school there, and with a charity that helps the schoolchildren with meals, books and uniforms. The charity also helps them if they complete their education and need further tools or equipment. Sadly some of the children that they met when they visited had since become homeless and some were orphaned.

small leopard

My friends came in and talked to the children about the school in Nepal, and we encouraged the children to draw themselves waving at the Nepalese schoolchildren so that we could send photos of the drawings to the headteacher there. A lot of the older children also wrote messages about how they were thinking of the Nepalese children.

small creaturesIt was a wonderful day and we raised over £250 to send to the charity. The children’s drawings are now displayed all around the school outside their classrooms (for as long as the blu-tack holds the heavy paper…)

With fantastic smudgy encouragement from Susie Walker, Hannah Dyson, Juliette Saville, Lucy Birkinshaw, Tessa Walliman, Steve Saville, Sarah Lowe and others! Thank you for the photos, Tessa Walliman.

small smudgy hands

2 thoughts on “Drawathon for Nepal

  1. I think this is one of the most innovative fundraisers I’ve heard of. Such a great way to connect kids to an event that is very far away and make it personal and real without overwhelming them.

    Like

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